Archive for April, 2016

Study: Kids Who Talk Back Are Likely to Be More Successful

Posted on April 27th, 2016 by The Learning Factor

There’s now vindication for troublesome kids everywhere: Studies show that children with more troublesome traits become more successful adults. While we might have driven our parents up the wall, for many of us, our bad attitudes and misbehavior might have made us better entrepreneurs.

 

Of course, that all depends on how well you channel your wild child past into being a more productive adult. You have to transition your problematic behavior into successful traits. And as anyone who knows how good it feels to be bad, that’s easier said than done.

 

Here are three things you did as a kid that made your parents cringe, but that can now make you a stronger, more prosperous entrepreneur.

1. Adolescents who talk back are more successful adults.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

This is why problem children grow up to be successful.

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How To Be A Better Leader: Four Essential Tips – Forbes

Posted on April 26th, 2016 by The Learning Factor

You don’t have to be in managerial role to be a leader. Follow these tips to inspire your colleagues and reap the benefits of a happier workplace.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com

You don’t have to be in managerial role to be a leader. Follow these tips to inspire your colleagues and reap the benefits of a happier workplace.

See on Scoop.itBusiness Brainpower with the Human Touch

10 Principles of Organizational Culture

Posted on April 26th, 2016 by The Learning Factor

If the answer to these last two questions is “rarely,” it wouldn’t surprise us. We don’t believe that swift, wholesale culture change is possible — or even desirable. After all, a company’s culture is its basic personality, the essence of how its people interact and work. However, it is an elusively complex entity that survives and evolves mostly through gradual shifts in leadership, strategy, and other circumstances. We find the most useful definition is also the simplest: Culture is the self-sustaining pattern of behavior that determines how things are done.

Made of instinctive, repetitive habits and emotional responses, culture can’t be copied or easily pinned down. Corporate cultures are constantly self-renewing and slowly evolving: What people feel, think, and believe is reflected and shaped by the way they go about their business. Formal efforts to change a culture (to replace it with something entirely new and different) seldom manage to get to the heart of what motivates people, what makes them tick. Strongly worded memos from on high are deleted within hours. You can plaster the walls with large banners proclaiming new values, but people will go about their days, right beneath those signs, continuing with the habits that are familiar and comfortable.

But this inherent complexity shouldn’t deter leaders from trying to use culture as a lever. If you cannot simply replace the entire machine, work on realigning some of the more useful cogs. The name of the game is making use of what you cannot change by using some of the emotional forces within your current culture differently.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.strategy-business.com

Companies can tap their natural advantage when they focus on changing a few important behaviors, enlist informal leaders, and harness the power of employees’ emotions.

See on Scoop.itBusiness Brainpower with the Human Touch