Blog

Posts Tagged "goal orientation"

Many Strategies Fail Because They’re Not Actually Strategies

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

Many strategy execution processes fail because the firm does not have something worth executing.

 

The strategy consultants come in, do their work, and document the new strategy in a PowerPoint presentation and a weighty report. Town hall meetings are organized, employees are told to change their behavior, balanced scorecards are reformulated, and budgets are set aside to support initiatives that fit the new strategy. And then nothing happens.

 

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do. Many strategies fail to get implemented, despite the ample efforts of hard-working people, because they do not represent a set of clear choices.

 

Many so-called strategies are in fact goals. “We want to be the number one or number two in all the markets in which we operate” is one of those. It does not tell you what you are going to do; all it does is tell you what you hope the outcome will be. But you’ll still need a strategy to achieve it.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do

The Three Measures of Your Leadership Success

Posted on January 13th, 2016 by The Learning Factor

Are you a successful leader? This is a difficult question to answer: No matter how good you think you are, the only evidence of leadership is whether people follow you. Self-serving bias distorts your perception of your own successes and failures. Even if you’re incredibly self-aware, you may have trouble with an objective assessment because your direct reports may only appear to be following — they don’t get an option to be physically present — and not every company conducts rigorous engagement surveys or 360-degree reviews.

So how can you gain a reasonably accurate understanding of your success as a leader? Try integrating three distinctive views.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.strategy-business.com

Assessing your effectiveness requires looking simultaneously at the past, the present, and the future.

See on Scoop.itBusiness Brainpower with the Human Touch

© 2017 The Learning Factor. All rights reserved.