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Posts Tagged "goals"

Everyone Hates Setting Goals. Here’s How Google Makes It Easier for Its Employees

Posted on February 12th, 2018 by The Learning Factor

It’s that time of year–leaders everywhere are charging employees with the task of establishing goals for 2018. If you’ve never been through a structured process, this exercise can be daunting, and frankly, feel like a big waste of time. I can assure you, it’s not. 

 

Setting goals is critical. Goals provide direction, help you focus, prioritize your time and energy, and ensure that you can objectively prove you’ve advanced the company’s agenda.

 

But just any goal won’t do. Research shows that goals are not only important but also that the level of specificity and difficulty matters. Goals that are both clear and challenging drive higher levels of performance.

 

To set their teams up for success, many organizations use SMART goals. Google leaders use something a little different–“Objectives and Key Results” (OKRs). On Google’s re:Work site, a resource that shares the company’s perspective on people operations, Google explains the concept.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

If a goal doesn’t challenge you, then it won’t change you.

Many Strategies Fail Because They’re Not Actually Strategies

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

Many strategy execution processes fail because the firm does not have something worth executing.

 

The strategy consultants come in, do their work, and document the new strategy in a PowerPoint presentation and a weighty report. Town hall meetings are organized, employees are told to change their behavior, balanced scorecards are reformulated, and budgets are set aside to support initiatives that fit the new strategy. And then nothing happens.

 

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do. Many strategies fail to get implemented, despite the ample efforts of hard-working people, because they do not represent a set of clear choices.

 

Many so-called strategies are in fact goals. “We want to be the number one or number two in all the markets in which we operate” is one of those. It does not tell you what you are going to do; all it does is tell you what you hope the outcome will be. But you’ll still need a strategy to achieve it.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do

How to Support Employees’ Learning Goals While Getting Day-to-Day Stuff Done

Posted on August 2nd, 2017 by The Learning Factor

Many of the most successful people had to fight tooth and nail for opportunities to learn new skills and advance up the corporate ladder. That’s often because what they wanted to learn and achieve wasn’t in sync with what their bosses wanted for them. You’re not a data scientist. You’re not cut out for engineering. Sales isn’t what you do. Lines like this are still used all too frequently when employees tell their managers that they want to move in a new direction.

 

But this is only half the story. Managers are under tremendous pressure to generate results. You have annual quotas, quarterly goals, and increasing competition. Who has time to let employees go learn skills that may not be relevant for years, or may not serve your unit at all?

 

I hear these challenges all the time as I work with managers at all levels, particularly in large corporations. I’ve also faced them myself with the companies I founded and scaled. It’s a tough balancing act. But I’ve learned key lessons to help managers turn lofty goals — such as making learning and development a central pillar of the workday — into real actions that mitigate damage to, and even help strengthen, the bottom line. Here’s how.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

It’s good for them, the team, and the company.

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