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Posts Tagged "lead"

This 5-Minute Rule Is Proven to Make Your Meetings More Productive

Posted on November 17th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

More companies are now embracing “agile” meetings and daily check-ins to make their teams more productive and efficient. The hard rule? Keep it under five minutes or be ready to be rudely cut off in front of your peers.

 

While some argue this laser approach to meetings won’t get anything accomplished, The Wall Street Journal recently published a story that convincingly declares otherwise.

 

Time is too precious to waste in high-demand business settings. The old ritual of booking conference rooms and clogging calendars with 30 or 60-minutes of drudgery is being replaced by five-minute huddles where teams cut to the chase and make decisions on the spot.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

A new meeting trend promises to increase efficiency and productivity.

Introvert Or Extrovert, Successful Entrepreneurs Share These 5 Traits

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

While clear-cut introverts and extroverts may be few and far between–with most people falling somewhere on the “ambiversion” spectrum–there is such a thing as an “entrepreneurial personality,” broadly speaking. That doesn’t mean all successful entrepreneurs are the same, of course. But for all the personality traits they don’t have in common, there are a few core characteristics successful founders share–and some of those traits are more obvious than others.

 

After all, whenever you read about or personally encounter a successful entrepreneur, you’re observing only the surface of where they are in the present moment. These are some of the more decisive internal qualities that drive founders’ success, no matter which qualities they outwardly project.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.fastcompany.com

No matter how their personalities appear to others, entrepreneurs all possess a few key, inner characteristics.

The Best Companies Know How to Balance Strategy and Purpose

Posted on November 8th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

Most companies have articulated their purpose — the reason they exist. But very few have made that purpose a reality for their organizations.

 

Consider Nokia. Before the iPhone was introduced, in 2007, Nokia was the dominant mobile phone maker with a clearly stated purpose — “Connecting people” — and an aggressive strategy for sustaining market dominance. Seeking to extend its technological edge (particularly in miniaturization), it acquired more than 100 startup companies while pursuing a vast portfolio of research and product development projects. In 2006 alone, Nokia introduced 39 new mobile-device models. Few imagined that this juggernaut, brandishing vast resources with such steely determination, could be quickly brought down.

 

In retrospect, it seems inevitable. Nokia was so immersed in executing its strategy that it lost sight of its purpose. When Steve Jobs introduced the first iPhone as “a leapfrog product that is way smarter than any mobile device has ever been, and super-easy to use,” Apple started “connecting people” at astounding new levels. Nokia’s purpose had been co-opted, making its myriad strengths irrelevant. The once-dominant Nokia soon lost much of its market cap and was eventually acquired by Microsoft.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

SpaceX, Nestlé, and Apple all do it.

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