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Posts Tagged "organizational psychology"

Building Behavioral Science Capability in Your Company

Posted on December 6th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

If you’re interested in behavioral economics, then you probably heard that Richard Thaler, one of the discipline’s founding fathers, was recently awarded the Nobel prize in economics. You might also be sold on how insights from behavioral science can make a big impact in your organization. You may even have piloted a couple of nudge-based interventions in your organization and are now asking yourself, “What’s next?”

 

You aren’t alone. Increasing numbers of companies are looking to build a behavioral science team — one that is located at the very center of their business and that the whole organization can benefit from. This makes sense, because the alternative is for behavioral insights to be tried out by individuals or specific departments, and their knowledge and skill are likely to vary: Someone in marketing might use their behavioral knowledge to develop more-effective campaigns, while at the same time someone in HR uses theirs to focus on employee engagement. Sales could be developing a behaviorally informed strategy, while operations looks for ways to cut costs.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

A six-step plan for sharing insights.

Increase the meaningfulness of your work by considering how it helps others

Posted on September 25th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

When we find our work meaningful and worthwhile, we are more likely to enjoy it, to be more productive, and feel committed to our employers and satisfied with our jobs. For obvious reasons, then, work psychologists have been trying to find out what factors contribute to people finding more meaning in their work.

 

Top of the list is what they call “task significance”, which in plain English means believing that the work you do is of benefit to others. However, to date, most of the evidence for the importance of task significance has been correlational – workers who see how their work is beneficial to others are more likely to find it meaningful, but that doesn’t mean that task significance is causing the feelings of meaningfulness.

 

Now Blake Allan at Purdue University has provided some of the first longitudinal evidence that seeing our work as benefiting others really does lead to an increase in our finding it meaningful. “These results are important both for the wellbeing of individual workers and as a potential avenue to increase productivity,” he concludes in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: digest.bps.org.uk

You will be happier and more productive in your work if you find it meaningful. 

Report: Only 7% Of Workers Feel Productive During Regular Work Hours

Posted on September 6th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

More of us are now awakening to the fact that workplaces are not quite the places of productivity that we hoped them to be. But that they are actually rife with distraction. Not to mention the painful hours of commuting tacked onto long days at the office.

 

All this can be avoided with a flexible work arrangement, and that’s an option that many are seeking nowadays.

 

According to a recent FlexJobs survey on remote work, 66% of professionals believed that they would be more productive if they worked remotely – instead of at a traditional office. The reasons cited in favor of remote work? 76% wanted “fewer interruptions from colleagues and fewer distractions,” 70% sought to “reduce stress from commuting,” and 69% preferred to avoid “office politics.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com

Some morning larks can churn out quality work in the early AMs, while others are the most energetic and creative during the unholy hours after midnight.

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