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Posts Tagged "Productivity"

8 Easy Workspace Fixes to Improve Productivity, Mood, Creativity, and Health

Posted on March 12th, 2018 by The Learning Factor

Yesterday I walked into my home office and examined the space from a fresh perspective. It hasn’t had a facelift in about ten years and I’ve hardly noticed its dingy appearance. Don’t get me wrong, I love my office but it’s simply out of date and no longer reflects my personality. It’s time for a change.

 

Approaching the challenge like any diligent, problem-solving coach, I did my research. What does science say about an office space that boosts energy, creativity, and productivity, all while projecting a safe, calm feeling for clients? Yes, it’s possible, and you can do it all on your own. Here’s what I’ve learned.

1. Use color, but not just any color.

Color psychology studies (and there are many) reveal changes in the body and brain when people view certain colors. These changes influence productivity, creativity, health, stress levels, focus, communication, and emotions. That’s some powerful influence!

 

Color psychologist Angela Wright explains the phenomenon this way: “Color travels to us on wavelengths of photons from the sun. Those are converted into electrical impulses that pass to the part of the brain known as the hypothalamus, which governs our endocrine system and hormones, and much of our activity.”

 

First decide what’s most important about how color affects you, your employees, and your visitors. In an interview with Chris Bailey, Wright offered this simple breakdown of the effects of color on the mind: “The four psychological primaries are: red, blue, yellow, and green. And they affect the body (red), the mind (blue), the emotions, the ego, and self-confidence (yellow), and the essential balance between the mind, the body, and the emotions (green).” But it’s not that simple. Bailey nicely breaks down the process of choosing just the right color in this article.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

No interior designer necessary. Here’s everything you need to know about creating a healthy office space that inspires and motivates everyone.

Our Obsession With Working Hard Is Ruining Our Productivity

Posted on February 9th, 2018 by The Learning Factor

What do you really need to get ahead at work?

 

I get asked this all the time. The answer varies depending on the person, their goals, and my mood, but there’s one answer I’ll never give: “Work hard.” That’s not an oversight or a misstep. It’s very intentional.

 

Whenever I hear some public speaker or Silicon Valley personality talk about how it just takes hard work to really succeed, I can’t help but roll my eyes a little. I’m sick of hearing people talk about working hard, keeping busy, putting their head down, etc. We’ve become too preoccupied with “the grind,” and it’s actually bringing us down.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.fastcompany.com

Hard work is important to success, but it’s dangerous to see it as the most important thing.

4 Self-Improvement Myths That May Be Holding You Back

Posted on February 5th, 2018 by The Learning Factor

Advice on how to improve one’s self is everywhere.  It accounts for about 2.5% of all book sales in the United States. Add in speeches, training programs, TV programs, online-products, coaches, yoga, and the like, self-help is a $10 billion industry per year, and that’s just in the U.S.

 

However, research shows that much of the advice extolled may be misleading or even wrong. Several myths about performance persist, despite research and practices that show they are half-truths at best. That might explain why the most likely purchasers of self-improvement books have bought another within the previous 18 months.  The first myth-riddled book didn’t work, so they bought another, and maybe another soon after.

 

A recent report in the Journal of Management noted that of nearly 25,000 academic articles on performance, only a fraction include what psychologists call within person variance, which describes ranges, such as that between individuals’ top, average and worst performances. Advice too often mistakenly assumes performance can be compared across people, using the same gauge. That’s absurd.

 

Our observation of hundreds of performance seekers largely confirms the report and has led to delineating a series of myths that hold people back when trying to improve. These assertions are based on a diverse set of fields, including psychology, sports, arts, and leadership. We hope that by dispelling these myths, explaining the reality and offering some sound advice instead, we can help move people toward more effective personal development.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

Stop comparing yourself with other people.

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