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Many Strategies Fail Because They’re Not Actually Strategies

Posted on November 15th, 2017 by The Learning Factor

Many strategy execution processes fail because the firm does not have something worth executing.

 

The strategy consultants come in, do their work, and document the new strategy in a PowerPoint presentation and a weighty report. Town hall meetings are organized, employees are told to change their behavior, balanced scorecards are reformulated, and budgets are set aside to support initiatives that fit the new strategy. And then nothing happens.

 

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do. Many strategies fail to get implemented, despite the ample efforts of hard-working people, because they do not represent a set of clear choices.

 

Many so-called strategies are in fact goals. “We want to be the number one or number two in all the markets in which we operate” is one of those. It does not tell you what you are going to do; all it does is tell you what you hope the outcome will be. But you’ll still need a strategy to achieve it.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

One major reason for the lack of action is that “new strategies” are often not strategies at all. A real strategy involves a clear set of choices that define what the firm is going to do and what it’s not going to do

What You Can Learn From the Strategies of Amazon, Apple, and Lego

Posted on February 5th, 2016 by The Learning Factor

Position yourself for the future by looking at what stays constant.  

That’s how star companies like Amazon, Apple, and Lego consistently leap ahead of competitors, say strategy experts Paul Leinwand and Cesare Mainardi in their new book, Strategy That Works.

The authors say that Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ November 2012 fireside chat (watch it on YouTube) perfectly explains this strategy. Here’s what Bezos said:

I very frequently get the question ‘What’s gonna change in the next 10 years?’…I almost never get the question ‘What’s not going to change in the next 10 years?’ And I submit to you that that second question is actually the more important of the two. Because you can build a business strategy around the things that are stable in time.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.inc.com

Too many leaders think about what’s going to change in the next 10 years, instead of what’s not.

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